I Don't Want To
Turn 3

Then all of a sudden Olivia screams “what are my dancing shoes doing in Jordan’s room?” The entire family runs to my private bedroom and Jackson yells “my dinosaurs” and Levi shrieks “my sea creatures” and Baker bawls “truck” and Grace cries “my dolls”. And Mommy looks at me like today will be  my last day alive. What goes through a toddler’s mind that parents are so desperate to understand?

4.5 out of 5

4.5/5

80+

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50+

The Secret Of
Retailing

In “Secrets of Retail,” Joseph shares practical, “been there, done that” advice on everything from the psychology of buying to hiring employees and working successfully with vendors and promoters. This invaluable book provides expert advice for small retailers, including a step-by-step guide to competing against Wal-Mart and other major chains, how to manage day-to-day operations and procedures (“retail detail”) easily and effectively, and how to ensure profits. Joseph covers all the nuts and bolts of setting up shop and building your business, including

3.7 out of 5

3.7/5
EJ
EJ
so cute and relevant!
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Good lessons for little ones
Julie Barrett
Julie Barrett
Rockford Illinois
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What I like about this story is that it's so realistic, funny at times and leaves you feeling good.
Mary Kay Morrison
Mary Kay Morrison
Rockford Illinois
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Wonderful way to share with kids about the importance of sharing!
Julie Porter's
Julie Porter's
Rockford Illinois
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One can imagine this book originated from a conversation between author, Gramps Jeffrey and his children or grandchildren.

Book Reviews For
"Gramps Jeffrey"

Jim Lamb
Jim Lamb
Renowned Journalist
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Gramps Jeffery's Award-Winning Book "I Don't Want To Turn 3" Helps Blaze a Trail Out of “The Terrible Twos” By Jim Lamb To paraphrase Kermit the Frog, “It isn’t easy being three.” Maybe that’s why the Twos are so terrible: Who’d want to leave a world where you’re the center of attention? I wouldn’t. Would you? For example, a 2-year-old says “Cookie!” and cookies magically appear—if not, the result can be a Grade A, Number One, Category 5 tantrum. Why? Because, like the seagulls in “Finding Nemo,” everything is “Mine! Mine! Mine! Mine! Mine!” That’s the foundation of Gramps Jeffery’s award-winning book, "I Don't Want To Turn 3" —the story of Jordan, who senses a new world is coming. Gramps opens the door to that world with story-telling and engaging illustrations. The best way for adults to get the most out of the book is to read it carefully multiple times before sharing it with children. Here’s why: Each page builds momentum towards a moment of realization. Preparation frees up parents and grandparents to observe a child’s body language to determine when to start a conversation. Some kids pick up on where the story is going early—some later. Here’s the essence: Jordan, age 2, begins with an attitude of “Mine! Mine! Mine!” That prompts him to take things from other children. When his antics are revealed (on his birthday, no less) the result is devastating—but it opens the door to learning valuable life-lessons. And it’s not theoretical. Gramps Jeffrey has six grandkids. During the pandemic, he spent time interacting with them. His book emerged from that. For example, Gramps took photos that were transformed to lively illustrations. Then he used the names of his grandkids, adding to the authenticity. Little wonder, then, the book won a Firebird Book Award and was recognized for “Honoring Excellence” by the Mom’s Choice Awards. "I Don't Want To Turn 3" was published by Authorhouse in paperback, Kindle, and hardcover. It’s available online, including Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Walmart. (ISBN-10 1665526947 ISBN-13 978-1665526944) ABOUT: In addition to "I Don't Want To Turn 3," Gramps Jeffrey (aka Marc Joseph) is the author of "The Secrets of Retailing... How to Beat Walmart" and a contributor to The Huffington Post. His areas of expertise include planning, recruiting, staffing, leadership, problem-solving and team building.
Julie Barrett
Julie Barrett
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What I like about this story is that it's so realistic, funny at times and leaves you feeling good. Children's colorful story about a little child who likes being 2 and knows the things he can do and not get punished. He has many relatives around his age and he starts collecting their favorite toys that he hides... I love that I can actually see and enlarge the words on the pages and can be enlarged. When the toys are all found the dad steps in and I love how this ends. Love charity and helping others less fortunate. The kids will now grow up and continue this practice themselves and teach their children the same things. Like why the author wrote this and the outcome he wanted from the adults involved. There's a saying when I grew up, mom would say 'wait til you have kids of your own' SO true!
JANE RILEY
JANE RILEY
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I Don't Want to Turn 3 by Gramps Jeffrey is a story that revolves around a boy named Jordan, who is just one day shy of turning three. Jordan believes that the day he turns three, his life will become challenging, and all his freedom will be snatched away! Jordan imagines the worst and he frets over how his parents might start holding him accountable for all his actions and will expect him to be more responsible overnight. The novel begins with a strong premise, where Jordan is a mischievous kid who takes whatever he wants from everyone and gets away with it because of how young he is. However, Jordan's fun and carefree life comes to a sudden halt when his cousins and sisters confront him. He finds himself trapped in a dilemma, about to be held responsible for all his devilish actions. Further along in the book, Jordan's father, while conversing with his son, sends a sweet message of compassion, tenderness, caring, sharing, and love in the most unexpected yet creative way. Gramps Jeffery’s novel is a must-read for young readers who wish to learn about wonderful human traits and how they make life beautiful while enjoying Jordan's exciting and relatable adventures as he attends birthday parties, plays with his toys, takes a bath, or visits the park. The story has a captivating and strong tone, while Jordan’s thought process is beautifully expressed. The colorful illustrations make the book a delightful read, with lessons for both toddlers and adults. This is one of the books that should be on any parent’s list for Christmas gifts for toddlers and growing children; it is intelligently plotted and skillfully written.
JANE RILEY
JANE RILEY
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I Don't Want to Turn 3 by Gramps Jeffrey is a story that revolves around a boy named Jordan, who is just one day shy of turning three. Jordan believes that the day he turns three, his life will become challenging, and all his freedom will be snatched away! Jordan imagines the worst and he frets over how his parents might start holding him accountable for all his actions and will expect him to be more responsible overnight. The novel begins with a strong premise, where Jordan is a mischievous kid who takes whatever he wants from everyone and gets away with it because of how young he is. However, Jordan's fun and carefree life comes to a sudden halt when his cousins and sisters confront him. He finds himself trapped in a dilemma, about to be held responsible for all his devilish actions. Further along in the book, Jordan's father, while conversing with his son, sends a sweet message of compassion, tenderness, caring, sharing, and love in the most unexpected yet creative way. Gramps Jeffery’s novel is a must-read for young readers who wish to learn about wonderful human traits and how they make life beautiful while enjoying Jordan's exciting and relatable adventures as he attends birthday parties, plays with his toys, takes a bath, or visits the park. The story has a captivating and strong tone, while Jordan’s thought process is beautifully expressed. The colorful illustrations make the book a delightful read, with lessons for both toddlers and adults. This is one of the books that should be on any parent’s list for Christmas gifts for toddlers and growing children; it is intelligently plotted and skillfully written.
Joanna Ang
Joanna Ang
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I Don’t Want to Turn 3 is a short picture book story written by Gramps Jeffrey for young children. The story starts with Jordan who is turning 3 really soon, but he is not very excited to turn 3. In fact, he is very reluctant to turn 3 because, in his mind, Jordan is able to do anything when he is 2. Once he turns 3, his parents and everyone around him will have different expectations of him. That would suck big time! His fear of turning 3 led to a series of mischievous actions, but nobody would know, would they? Anyway, nothing bad ever happens to him when he is 2. I Don’t Want to Turn 3 is a perfect depiction of what the average family goes through with a toddler in the house. The character, Jordan, showed the struggles and dilemmas that a child regularly faces while growing up. Gramps Jeffrey has successfully captured the natural human desire and instinct that is portrayed, even from a young age, to take whatever they like and keep it for themselves. I also really liked how Gramps Jeffrey incorporated the importance of helping others in need, as well as sharing with those around us. The wide array of characters of various ages also showcases the importance of this life lesson to people of all age groups, and it also heightens the complexity of the storyline. Moreover, I really enjoyed the colorful illustrations throughout the story, which intensify the moral behind this tale. I would recommend this book to young children for its valuable life lesson behind a very realistic and relatable story.
Shrubaboti Bose
Shrubaboti Bose
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Have you ever wished to be a child again?

 Yes, we all have gone through those moments when we suddenly yearn for our lost childhood. The time when our parents cradled us and kept us safe, when we had nothing to worry about, nobody to blame us, no responsibilities. Life was easy, wasn't it? Then we grew up and everything changed.

In this book, Jeffrey explores the universal human desire to run away from problems and to be selfish, preoccupied with only their own things. Although Jordan is about to turn 3 years old, as soon as he realizes that with age comes an increased sense of responsibility, he becomes reluctant to accept it. He wants to continue being the little boy who never gets scolded.

The story skillfully narrates different ways in which our protagonist acts out in his own interests and towards the end, he is caught red handed. It's important to note here that when his father reprimands Jordan, he doesn't use shame or fear to influence the child towards the right path, instead, he lets the other children express their emotions after losing the dear objects and this helps Jordan to empathize with them, to understand their grievances.

Beautifully illustrated, this is a simple story with a valuable message hidden within it. One needs to learn to shoulder their responsibility, to be accountable for their actions and to generously share their possessions with others. Recommended for children aged 3-6 years and parents who wish to read out stories to their kids.
Romuald Dzemo
Romuald Dzemo
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Jordan is just a day away from turning three and he is not happy about it. In fact, the thought itself troubles the child. He knows that when he turns three, his parents will expect more from him: being responsible and held accountable for his actions. So, turning three could mean not being able to grab things from his cousin, Jackson. He can’t just get away anymore with things that are excused on his age. And when he remembers his father saying, “The biggest lesson you can learn on your birthday is caring about others and showing compassion for those not as fortunate as you and your cousins,” he feels even more horrible about it. But is Jordan ready to grow? I Don't Want to Turn 3 by Gramps Jeffrey introduces a young, compelling protagonist and explores a conflict that is played out in almost every normal family. The story starts with a strong premise: Jordan doesn’t just want to turn three. He is a mischievous kid who “takes” things that do not belong to him. As a child, he believes that everything is his to take and that is justified by his age. When everything comes crashing down and he is confronted by his sister and cousins, he finds himself in a difficult situation, about to experience the fury of everyone. In a creative and unexpected manner, his father comes in as a mediator and offers advice that families can use to start conversations on the values of compassion, caring, tenderness, love, and sharing. Gramps Jeffrey’s book is a gorgeous treat for young readers. I read this book with my three-year-old daughter and the conversation that followed was interesting. Young readers will relate to Jordan and his adventures, playing and bathing with his cousins, visiting the park with his family for his brother’s first birthday, and going to the zoo with Grandma. The story is told in a strong and captivating voice and the point of view of Jordan is brilliantly executed. The colorful illustrations enhance the reading experience for young readers, turning it into an exciting and delightful one. I Don't Want to Turn 3 is a book you want to read with growing toddlers. It is a book with a timeless lesson, one that adults still need to revisit.
Diane Donovan
Diane Donovan
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When does a toddler start to learn right from wrong? What happens in a family that influences a decision going through a young mind? "I Don't Want to Turn 3" by author Gramps Jeffrey explores the interaction between families that is happening in just about every household in the world. While very highly recommended, especially for family, daycare center, preschool, elementary school, and community library picture book life skills & values collections for children ages 3-5, it should be noted for personal reading lists that "I Don't Want to Turn 3" is also readily available in a paperback edition (9781665526937, $14.99) and in a digital book format (Kindle, $4.99).
John Kerry
John Kerry
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My kid is mesmerised by the beautiful illustrations and super engaged with the genuinely heartwarming story and message. I must say it's a breath of fresh air ! Fantastic little story My children enjoy it and ask questions. Five Stars One of the best children books I have read this month! Highly recommend it! I only leave positive feedback and reviews when I love the book. Feel free to ask anything regarding this book. A must read for sure. I'd recommend this book to everyone who would like to read an amazing children book. The book is written in a very interesting way . A must read for sure
Julie Porter's
Julie Porter's
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One can imagine this book originated from a conversation between author, Gramps Jeffrey and his children or grandchildren. I Don't Want to Turn 3 is about Jordan who isn't excited about his upcoming third birthday. He is used to being treated like a baby and adults letting him have his way because he is so young. When he turns three, he will have to learn about rules, sharing, and responsibility. The more Jordan thinks about it, the more he is looking forward to his upcoming birthday and growing older. This is a simple story which teaches kids social skills, getting along with others, and the advantages and disadvantages to growing up and growing older. It is written from a child's point of view with an awareness that kids can be selfish and bratty at times but are also capable of learning and understanding. The illustrations are charming in a cartoonish way. Jordan is always at the center because kids often want to be the center of attention. He is often surrounded by toys and other people struggling with what he wants and what he has to do. Kids will find I Don't Want to Turn 3 completely relatable and parents will be able to recognize the world from their child's point of view.
Nikita
Nikita
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What a stunning book. The illustrations are beautiful, especially the last one! The story carries such an important message which I think is particularly important in times when your child is growing up. Another great book from @authorgrampsjeffrey Amazingly woven like an interesting spell. I didn't think this book was going to be this good. It was , as you might expect , engaging , a total different piece of art from every aspect. It sets a very high bar for whatever he does that comes next. Must Read
Anne Holmes
Anne Holmes
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This sweet picture book is author Gramps Jeffrey’s first. He wrote it after having the opportunity to spend more time with his grandkids during the past year’s pandemic. Gramps says, “I wrote this book to read to (my) grandkids. Their reaction has been invaluable. As you read aloud and watch them begin to understand Jordan’s discovery of right versus wrong, you can see the older kids recognition that they have gone through the same dilemma. While the younger kids don’t quite yet understand the concept of sharing. This whole experience, for me, has been priceless.” The book’s layout, alternating a full-page graphic similar to the one pictured here with a page of text is perfect, because it allows the reader to point out key elements of the story which are portrayed in the accompanying picture, a tactic which helps turn the storytelling experience into an interactive one. This is a fun book, which deals with an interesting – and universal – situation: two-year old Jordan doesn’t want to age into the role of a three-year old, because he’s been enjoying all the things his he’s been allowed to get away with as the baby of the family. But of course, we adults know time stops for no one… This is not author Jeffrey’s first foray into authoring, but it is his first children’s book, and we hope he chooses to write more. After all, with four kids and six grandchildren, he has plenty of personal experiences which he can mine for topics. He says he’s spent time recently observing – as a Baby Boomer – just how the kids are growing up today and trying to understand just how much the world has evolved since he was 3 years old.
Emily-Jane Hills Orford
Emily-Jane Hills Orford
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Birthdays – do we really want them? I mean, who wants to turn a year older? Especially when things are going so well at the age we are currently. As Jordan is quickly learning, approaching the age of 3, each year of our life we have more expectations placed upon us. Scary! And, sometimes, overwhelming! So, why not just stay the age we are and forget about those additional expectations? That’s what Jordan thinks. He doesn’t want to turn 3 and endure the added responsibilities his parents might enforce. You see, Jordan has a problem. He steals toys from his cousins and siblings and hides them in his room. Everyone is upset to lose their treasured possessions, but when they find them in Jordan’s room, on his birthday, they are even more upset. Dad formulates a family session to sort out the problem and teach Jordan and the other children that it’s not right to take what isn’t theirs to take, and sometimes it’s better to give than receive. Gramps Jeffrey’s picture book story, I Don’t Want to Turn 3, is a clever way to teach young readers about responsibilities, telling the truth, and caring for others. The story follows Jordan as he approaches his third birthday and how he goes through a phase of taking things that aren’t his to take. Told in simple language with colorful illustrations to help carry the story along, young readers will instantly catch on to the issue of right and wrong as they, along with Jordan, learn some important lessons. Beautifully told and presented with valuable lessons for readers of all ages, specifically taking responsibility for our own actions.
Shrabastee Chakraborty
Shrabastee Chakraborty
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Reviewed By Shrabastee Chakraborty for Readers’ Favorite Generally, children cannot wait to grow up and do all the grown-up things. However, 2-year-old Jordan is an exception. He doesn’t want to grow older as that would change a lot of things for him. You see, Jordan loves to play with his cousins, but he has a disturbing habit of taking their toys for himself and hoarding them. The distraught cousins cannot tell him anything. Jordan’s young age often saves him from severe repercussions. But what happens when Cousin Olivia spots her dancing shoes in his room? Find out in I Don’t Want to Turn 3, a picture book by Gramps Jeffrey. Although the book resembles children’s literature, the valuable lessons it imparts would benefit readers of all ages. Gramps Jeffrey emphasizes how growing up does not necessarily mean increasing in age but growth in maturity level. Growing up implies that we should be able to take responsibility for our actions. After a certain age, we should learn to distinguish between right and wrong, too. At the same time, Jeffrey’s book teaches us that we should not be afraid of voicing our opinion if we ever feel hurt or deceived. I admired the poignant messages hidden in such a simple story. The eye-catching illustrations perfectly captured the essence of the book. While I Don’t Want to Turn 3 is a good book for a young audience, I believe parents should read it to youngsters and explain the lessons. I daresay many adults might need these life lessons, too.
Joy Hannabass
Joy Hannabass
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I Don't Want to Turn 3 by Gramps Jeffrey is a really cute story about Jordan, who is turning three tomorrow. But today Jordan is still a happy two-year-old because everyone in his family will let him have his way, simply because he is only two. Jordan does some pretty unkind things to his cousins and friends, like taking their toys and hiding them in his room, while he can still get by with it. At this point in the tale, Jordan is actually happy about his greedy actions. That is until, on the day that he turns three, one of his cousins starts screaming because she finds her shoes in the pile of toys in his room. Jordan has finally been caught, and his dad isn't happy with him. So, for his punishment, he tells Jordan and his cousins what is to be done with every toy, including the ones Jordan gets for his birthday. Author Gramps Jeffrey does a really nice job writing this adorable book. It teaches children the valuable lessons of responsibility, never stealing from others, and always sharing what you have. The illustrations on the cover and throughout this book are fantastic in bringing the words of the story to life before your eyes. This is a book you will want to read to your children over and over. I really think the lessons here in I Don't Want to Turn 3 by Gramps Jeffrey can be for any age, even adults, because sometimes we just don't want to share. I love that in the end Jeffrey weaves everything together and comes up with a conclusive ending that also starts a unique family tradition. Add this book to your child's library. I also think it would be an awesome addition to any class, school, or daycare library.
Fran Lewis
Fran Lewis
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Responsibility for your actions and justifying doing the wrong thing is at the heart of this children’s book that will teach not only Jordan are young man about to turn 3 values and valuable lessons in life but other young readers too. Turning 3 presents a problem for Jordan who feels that his mother will expect him to be more responsible and take on more responsibilities. Jackson is his cousin and they spent time playing with his dinosaur collection but that didn’t stop Jordan from taking them and because he’s two let him keep them. Jackson was not happy. He continued to do the same with other cousins and even his little sister and her dolls. Jordan seemed to feel that since they never realized what he was doing that it was okay, and no harm done. The fact that no one realized it is amazing or they never thought he would do that. Things are about change when he turns 3 and a startling revelation and truths are found. His birthday party has everyone he wanted invited and remember they are the same people who’s toys he hid in his room. Presents given and excited about them until everyone goes to his room and Olivia realizes where her stuff was hidden and then so does everyone else. Imagine what they thought and what his father will do. Instead of ranting and yelling his father brought everybody into one room and each person told Jordan how they felt when they realized their toys were gone and how they feel right now . They sat in a circle and tried working it out. Putting on your solving problem that was a fantastic way for each child to decide for themselves what right and what is wrong. As Jackson spoke first and followed by the rest letting Jodi know that their toys are for everyone but belongs to each one of them. Sharing is the key and his Dad asked if there was anything he wanted to share with the group. Read and understand what his father says and what Olivia suggests as a solution. Helping others that are in need is a positive way to show that you care about the less fortunate. Olivia has a positive solution to the problem what do you the reader think? His Dad continues with what he states as the biggest lesson he can learn from this is caring and showing compassion for the less fortunate and his cousins. What was the right thing to do? Would Jordan learn the lessons alone or will his cousins follow suit and do the same thing? Some endings are new beginnings and as Jordan learns the true meaning of honesty, family loyalty, understanding, compassion and taking ownership of your mistakes. Is there a significant difference between being 2 and 3? Think about it or is every age different and we learn more about ourselves as we grow older, more mature but our values and loyalties stay the same. Jordan : you might not have wanted to turn 3 but look at the valuable lessons you learned when you did as author Gramps Jeffrey hit the nail on the five-star head with this insightful and positive way to teach honesty and values. A great parent, teacher and guidance counselor resource and great fit family and school discussions. Life has a way of teaching lessons and at any age you can learn the true meaning of all of the values that the author has brought to light.

Amazon Reviews For
"Gramps Jeffrey"

Julie Barrett
Julie Barrett
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What I like about this story is that it's so realistic, funny at times and leaves you feeling good. Children's colorful story about a little child who likes being 2 and knows the things he can do and not get punished. He has many relatives around his age and he starts collecting their favorite toys that he hides... I love that I can actually see and enlarge the words on the pages and can be enlarged. When the toys are all found the dad steps in and I love how this ends. Love charity and helping others less fortunate. The kids will now grow up and continue this practice themselves and teach their children the same things. Like why the author wrote this and the outcome he wanted from the adults involved. There's a saying when I grew up, mom would say 'wait til you have kids of your own' SO true!
bookmaven
bookmaven
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Great catalyst to start the conversation with your younger children about the difference between right and wrong and the benefits of sharing with each other. The ending is a lesson we can all learn no matter how old we are.
ktm5
ktm5
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This was a funny book, with a great lesson about sharing and donating to others, and very fitting for me and my 2 year old daughter. She is beginning that “it’s mine” phase. This story is about a boy named Jordan. He is 2, almost 3. He starts out by taking his cousin Jackson’s dinosaur toys away from him. He just pulls them right out of Jackson’s hands. Jackson cries and his mommy just says that Jordan is only 2, let him have them. The next thing that happened, Jordan is taking a bath with his other cousin, Levi. He ends up stealing all of his sea creature toys and hiding them in a pile with his new dinosaur toys. Then Jordan stole his little brother's toy trucks while he was napping. Then he ends up taking his cousin Grace’s dolls and adding them to his growing pile of toys. Then Jordan takes his cousin Olivia’s dance shoes. Now on the day of Jordan’s 3rd birthday as he is opening presents, Olivia comes in and asks “what are my dance shoes doing in Jordans room?” Jordan gets caught and everyone sees that he has stolen their things. In the end we get to learn that when we share our toys, everyone gets to have fun. Olivia even offers an idea that they donate their toys, even Jordan’s that he just opened for his birthday, to the local homeless shelter for kids. I think everyone with kids will relate to this book the way that children act with their toys when young. The illustrations are bright and fun and it just has a great lesson to teach children.
	Joni Marie Iraci
Joni Marie Iraci
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"A Must Read for Parents, Grandparents and Childcare Workers"
While written in a too mature voice for a child so young, this book is the perfect go-to for parents and others to help open up the discussion of right and wrong; what belongs to others, and other essential learning tools. Young children are sponges and while they may not fully understand all the words being read, they will absorb the meaning and apply it to their interactions. I can't wait to read this to my grandson and share it with the demon child who lives next door.
Joe
Joe
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"Perfect Book to Read Aloud to a Child or Children"
I Don't Want to Turn 3 by Gramps Jeffery takes readers on a journey into Jordan's world. Jordan's two years old and scared because his parents expect more of him when he turns three tomorrow, and Jordan discovers what happens when you take, when you share, and when you give back. I was curious why this author wrote I Don't Want to Turn 3 and contacted them to find out why. Gramps Jeffrey said they wrote this book for grandparents who want to be more involved in influencing how this latest generation grows up. Hearing this made me an instant fan, not because I'm a grandparent. But because, like many of you who want to make the world a better place, I believe this can be done through our acts and deeds children see. And that's why I recommend I Don't Want to Turn 3 by Gramps Jeffery.
Barbara Mojica
Barbara Mojica
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Jordan is about to turn 3 years old and he is not thrilled. He believes that up to now he has succeeded in doing pretty much as he pleases. Jordan swipes prized possessions and toys from his siblings and cousins. Then he hides them in his room. Up to this time, adults have made excuses for him, saying he is only two. Jordan must face the consequences when his "stash" is unexpectedly discovered in his room Dad sits everyone down for a serious talk. Jordan learns that bad behavior brings consequences. The large and colorful illustrations appeal to a preschool audience. Children can follow them while an adult reads the story aloud. One suggestion I have is that the text near the end of the story be spread out on several pages to make the story flow read better. Highly recommended read for children ages two through six.
Jbarr5
Jbarr5
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I Don't Want to Turn 3 by Gramps Jeffrey What I like about this story is that it's so realistic, funny at times and leaves you feeling good. Children's colorful story about a little child who likes being 2 and knows the things he can do and not get punished. He has many relatives around his age and he starts collecting their favorite toys that he hides... I love that I can actually see and enlarge the words on the pages and can be enlarged. When the toys are all found the dad steps in and I love how this ends. Love charity and helping others less fortunate. The kids will now grow up and continue this practice themselves and teach their children the same things. Like why the author wrote this and the outcome she wanted from the adults involved. There's a saying when I grew up, mom would say 'wait til you have kids of your own' SO true! Received a review copy from the author and this is my honest opinion.
Samfreene
Samfreene
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Responsibility for your actions and justifying doing the wrong thing is at the heart of this children’s book that will teach not only Jordan are young man about to turn 3 values and valuable lessons in life but other young readers too. Turning 3 presents a problem for Jordan who feels that his mother will expect him to be more responsible and take on more responsibilities. Jackson is his cousin and they spent time playing with his dinosaur collection but that didn’t stop Jordan from taking them and because he’s two let him keep them. Jackson was not happy. He continued to do the same with other cousins and even his little sister and her dolls. Jordan seemed to feel that since they never realized what he was doing that it was okay and no harm done. The fact that no one realized it is amazing or they never thought he would do that. Things are about change when he turns 3 and a startling revelation and truths are found. His birthday party has everyone he wanted invited and remember they are the same people who’s toys he hid in his room. Presents given and exited about them until everyone goes to his room and Olivia realizes where her stuff was hidden and then so does everyone else. Imagine what they thought and what his father will do. Instead of ranting and yelling his father brought everybody into one room and each person told Jordan how they felt when they realized their toys were gone and how they feel right now . They sat in a circle and tried working it out. Putting on your solving problem hat was a great way for each child to decide for themselves what right and what is wrong. As Jackson spoke first and followed by by the rest letting Jodi know that their toys are for everyone but belongs to each one of them. Sharing is the key and his Dad asked if there was anything he wanted to share with the group. Read and understand what his father says and what Olivia suggests as a solution. Helping others that are in need is a positive way to show that you care about the less fortunate. Olivia has a positive solution to the problem what do you the reader think? His Dad continues with what he states as the biggest lesson he can learn from this is caring and showing compassion for the less fortunate and his cousins. What was the right thing to do? Would Jordan learn the lessons alone or will his cousins follow suit and do the same thing? Some endings are new beginnings and as Jordan learns the true meaning of honesty, family loyalty, understanding, compassion and taking ownership of your mistakes. Is there a big difference between being 2 and 3? Think about it or is every age different and we learn more about ourselves as we grow older, more mature but our values and loyalties stay the same. Jordan : you might not have wanted to turn 3 but look at the valuable lessons you learned when you did as author Gramps Jeffrey hit the nail on the five star head with this insightful and positive way to teach honesty and values. A great parent, teacher and guidance counselor resource and great fit family and school discussions.
Guitarpeace
Guitarpeace
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This was an excellent book! An eye-opener into what our kids are thinking. this book is excellent because it teaches selflessness instead of being selfish. Very impressed with this book and an excellent learning tool!
Mary Kay Morrison
Mary Kay Morrison
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Wonderful way to share with kids about the importance of sharing!
D. Jones
D. Jones
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I Don’t Want to Turn 3 is a such a fun book, I read through it twice by myself before reading it to my young nieces. I laughed at the “brat” named Jordan, who spends the book learning the author’s version of the Golden Rule. He learns that he is no longer a baby and has to treat others well. I’ll read it again to my nieces and again to myself and we’ll all learn one of life’s most important lessons. The illustrations are darling and ready for any one-year-old to point at.
Julie S. Porter
Julie S. Porter
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One can imagine this book originated from a conversation between author, Gramps Jeffrey and his children or grandchildren. I Don't Want to Turn 3 is about Jordan who isn't excited about his upcoming third birthday. He is used to being treated like a baby and adults letting him have his way because he is so young. When he turns three, he will have to learn about rules, sharing, and responsibility. The more Jordan thinks about it, the more he is looking forward to his upcoming birthday and growing older. This is a simple story which teaches kids social skills, getting along with others, and the advantages and disadvantages to growing up and growing older. It is written from a child's point of view with an awareness that kids can be selfish and bratty at times but are also capable of learning and understanding. The illustrations are charming in a cartoonish way. Jordan is always at the center because kids often want to be the center of attention. He is often surrounded by toys and other people struggling with what he wants and what he has to do. Kids will find I Don't Want to Turn 3 completely relatable and parents will be able to recognize the world from their child's point of view.
TW
TW
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Really enjoyable. As the father of a 3-year-old and a first-time parent so much of this resonates with me - despite the fact our little one is three now we still feel like we are only just starting to try and figure this stuff out.
MBY
MBY
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like the way the book is set out and how we are lead to believe that the book is intended for children to learn about the value of sharing, but there are some nice reminders of positive adult behaviour aswell. The father asking everyone to sit and think in a group and trusting the children in their own decision making process. There are a number of ways you can use the book with your kids. I think that's great.

Youtube Reviews For
"Gramps Jeffrey"

Peg Bell
Peg Bell
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Good Afternoon Gentlemen, I enjoyed listening to Gramps, what he had to say about reading, sharing and how important it is for kids to read, be read to and to ask questions to drive their creativity, listening skills and comprehension. I recall in grade school they asked us to write about what we wanted to be when we grew up. I had the answers but not the education and training details it would take to get there. We had very few kids books in the house when growing up and I can only recall twice being read to by a parent. I struggled with reading in primary school and went to summer school that remedied it. A few of my favorite books in youth that I still have today are an ancient enormous very detailed rice papered like dictionary and a colorful picture laden book of anatomy physiology. Little did I know then how influential those two books would be in enhancing my career path. Discipline as a child took no more than a" look" from either mom or dad to correct whatever unwanted behavior was being exhibited. The dreaded phrase of " Just wait till I tell your dad when he gets home" would strike the fear of God in you. We never got spanked but were well aware of when a line was crossed, not do it again and tow the line. Jordan Peterson would be happy to know I always and still do clean my room and keep it that way. Never was I told to do it nor have thought of it any other way. It's just something done without question. Todays childhood would have to be so different as you mentioned with the internet and the massive influx of information coming at us from all angles. Whatever happened to the kid with a handful of toys creating their own amusement vs having the boob tube being proscriptive of it. Education and play come in many forms! Pets are another wonderful teacher of responsibility, compassion and companionship. When in adulthood did we loose the significance of healthy play and the beneficial aspects of taking a nap? Time, work and responsibilities can all mount up but not should go our sense of wonder, discovery and creativity. I didn't have kids but when around them I too get enjoyment out of their curiosity, problem solving and perception of the world around them. Great interview with Gramps. I appreciated his seasoned perspective as well as from the both of you. Have a great day!